FINDING ANALOG JOYS IN A DIGITAL LIFE

Who would have guessed that in 2021 our fingers would sometimes get the most exercise in a day out of all parts of the body. Typing, texting, scrolling, and pretty much every type of button-pushing comes from the digits attached to our hands, and it seems more and more unrealistic to see a day where we are not tethered to a device for at least half of the day. So tap tap away. Sure, you’d be living in the stone age if you tried to argue it’s not a digital world. With work from home, Facetime/Zoom, and every social media platform, the digital world is actually required for most career paths and lifestyles. In school as a child you practiced handwriting and cursive, but it wouldn’t be shocking to see less focus on this and more on typing and other technological practices. So while the world is spinning on its axis and your world is spinning in your pocket, it’s definitely nice to find ways to unplug and go analog. Sans technology.

We’ve covered all the benefits of reading. So we can skip that one. But if you need to be convinced why you need to start picking up books, magazines, or any published works, head over HERE + HERE.

A great source of analog enjoyment comes in two forms but is rooted in an age-old elementary school practice: writing. We often write texts, emails, pretty much any form of communication. But try writing maybe in a journal instead of writing a status update. Jot down thoughts or ideas and put pen to paper. Take meeting notes or notes for class in a notebook or on a pad. It’ll keep your handwriting a little less sloppy and also instill the information into your brain better if you are trying to memorize or really compute something. Secondly, and this is way less practiced than the first, is writing for communication. Obviously you wouldn’t want to send something urgent through the postal service, but writing thank you cards, sending birthday cards, or holiday cards christened with your handwriting can go a long way. It sends a sweet message and you’ll also feel great when the recipient acknowledges the effort that went into not only writing but getting the handwritten letter to them. 

While we can be displeased with our technology overload in our lives, one thing we can thank the latest tech boom for is the ability for pretty much everyone to have a high powered camera in their pocket. With the newest iPhones taking amazing quality photos, we can thank Apple for letting us easily capture life’s moments at a moment’s notice. But one analog practice that has been gaining increasing popularity and serves a similar purpose is the use of film cameras. With a recognizable grain and “warmth” to the photos, it seems like more and more people are picking up film cameras to capture some of the ups and downs of this thing we call life. It can be rather relaxing shooting film, and really help you detach from the day to day responsibilities- especially if you leave the phone at home.  But if you have to, bring the phone with you to secure a backup shot in case you were out of focus or didn’t load the film properly. With analog practices comes many mistakes, as there is no correction service to rely on. 

While there are only two suggestions, both are easy to enact. Okay, so you might need to purchase a film camera. If that’s the case, try writing first. But hunting for a vintage camera is fun. It’ll bring you to thrift stores and good wills to find a steal, and you’ll feel a sense of accomplishment if you strike gold. For now, that’s all we have for you. More analog things we have spoken about on this site, working out and surfing, also are great options to get away from the grid. And there are hundreds of more things you can do. But for now, give one of the above practices a go.

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